CALENDAR YEAR TIPS

 

 

JANUARY

  • Time to plant trees (fall and winter are best)!  Use PHC tree & shrub saver when planting.

  • Established trees and shrubs that need to be moved should be transplanted while completely dormant.  Dig carefully and hold soil in place around roots.Use PHC tree & shrub saver for transplants.

  • Prune trees & apply Sealer to large cuts.

  • Be sure to water in winter every two weeks to protect from freeze damage.

     

    FEBRUARY

  • Start Pre-Emergent program to keep weed seeds from germinating.  AVERT granules will take care of broadleaf and grassy type weeds (use AMAZE for flower beds ).For Bermuda spray existing weeds with FERTILOME Weed-Free Zone.

  • Feed trees & shrubs using BAYER Tree & Shrub Fertilizer or Fruit & Citrus Fertilizer.

  • Be sure to water.

  • Top dress with Cotton Burr Compost or Back To Nature/Nature's Blend for a healthier, stronger lawn.

  • Apply Dormant Oil to trees.

     

    MARCH

  • Apply first application of FERTILOME Green Maker Fertilizer to lawn (every two months).

  • Add soil amendments to garden areas & flowerbeds to prep beds for spring planting. NATURAL GUARD Soil Activator is an excellent additive for gardens or lawns and may be applied at the time of fertilizing.

  • Check for Borer damage; use FERTILOME product to treat.  Use Tree & Shrub Treatment on all trees & shrubs to kill & prevent insects for one full year.

  • Apply BAYER Season Long Grub Control .

  • Watch for late freezes.

  • Plant garlic, potatoes, rhubarb, & asparagus!

     

    APRIL

  • Bermuda & St. Augustine sod becomes available.

  • Check out new bedding plants (Elephant Ears, Caladiums, Roses, Sod, etc.)!

  • Spray Systemic for pine tip moths.

  • Apply BAYER Rose Care Systemic Fertilizer.

  • Remember – Arbor Day is the last Friday in April!

     

    MAY

  • Apply second round of FERTILOME Green Maker Fertlizer to lawns.

  • Use Systemic Fungicides & Insecticides on roses, vines, shrubs & grasses.

  • Fertilize spring bedding plants with FOX FARM Big Bloom or Tiger Bloom.

  • Check for seeding Bermuda; night time temperatures on average of 65 degrees.

  • Discard standing water to prevent mosquito infestation.

  • Spray for Bagworms with FERTILOME.

  • Spray any existing weeds with BONIDE Weed Beater.

     

    JUNE

  • Top dress beds with Mulch to help keep weeds down & retain moisture as it gets hotter.

  • Add FOX FARM Big Bloom or Tiger Bloom to Crape Myrtles to promote longer bloom time.

  • Spray any existing weeds in flower beds with ORNAMEC "Over-the-Top."

     

    JULY

  • Use Bloom Set on Tomatoes to prevent shedding due to heat.

  • Give extra care & water to trees, shrubs & plants while weather is hot.

  • Plant summer color!

  • Apply FERTILOME Green Maker Fertilizer to lawns.

     

    AUGUST

  • Watch for yellowing of grasses caused by lack of iron; use Dr. Iron.

  • Fungus may also cause yellowing & eventually death of turf grasses if not treated; use BONIDE Infuse or FERTILOME Fungicide.

  • Watch for insects on trees & shrubs; when found treat them quickly.

  • Apply Grub Control.

     

    SEPTEMBER

  • Apply second round of AVERT Pre-Emergent .

  • Plant Fesue Seed later September through mid-November.

  • Final sod installation.

  • Clean out beds to get ready for Pansies.

  • Plant Mums, Dianthus, Snapdragons & Dusty Miller now!

  • Apply FERTILOME Winterizer Fertilizer (10-0-14) to lawns.

     

    OCTOBER

  • Plant trees & shrubs; be sure to use PHC Tree & Shrub Saver!

  • Contact us to get any construction on ponds, patios & sprinkler systems.

  • Contact us with any questions you have about winterizing ponds & fountains.

  • Time for winter color!

     

    NOVEMBER

  • Plant Pansies, Stock, & Snapdragons with Blood Meal!  Use Holly-Tone when planting Cabbage & Kale.

  • Plant trees!

  • Christmas Cactus, Poinsettias, & live Christmas trees arrive!

     

    DECEMBER

  • Water trees, shrubs & lawns.

  • After Christmas plant spring bulbs with Bone Meal.

  • Apply Dormant Oil to trees.

  • Plant trees!

  • Prune trees & shrubs now through March.

 

**********

 

THE BASICS –

 For Mini Gardens, Fairy Gardens & Terrariums

 

When making a mini garden, fairy garden or a terrarium you are only limited by your imagination.  The following are basic guidelines to help you build your own “little world.”

 

  • Choose the container.The size of the container will determine how much other materials you will need to use.

     

  • The first layer is for drainage so that your soil doesn’t stay soggy.You may use ½” - 1” of perlite, pea gravel or rock of your choosing.

 

  • A thin layer of charcoal is added next.Charcoal absorbs odors from any organic materialthat is decomposing and keeps the soil “sweet.”

 

  • Design your layout before adding soil, etc.Do you want different levels or walls?What type of plants (or just mosses) will you use?Will you add mini furniture, people &/or animals?

 

  • Add damp soil (not soggy).Squeeze excess water out of soil beforelayering it.

 

  • Begin to install your hardscape next.If you are planning different levels the walls should be installed before you put in plants.

 

  • After your hardscape is in you will have the available area ready for planting.NOTE – All plants should be well watered before installing them.(Moss does not need to be watered.)

 

  • Finish off your mini landscape with mosses or ground covers.You may set in your décor, stepstones, walkways, patios, etc.

 

  • If you are using a closed container it will make it’s own humidity.It isn’t unusual to have some “fogging” during the first weeks.You may leave the lid slightly open/ajar to relieve this.Be sure to seal the lid back up so that your garden doesn’t dry out.

 

  • If you are using an open or lidless container the water requirements will depend upon what type of plants, if any, are used.

 

***********

BASIC BONSAI TIPS

 

LIGHT –

 

Whether placing your Bonsai inside or outside it will need plenty of indirect light.  Inside near a bright sunny window (but not on the windowsill) is great in cooler temperatures but not in hot summers.  Outside morning light is good but not our baking afternoon sun.  Covered porches work well.

 

It is recommended that all Bonsai be placed outside for at least a couple of months in summer to get the benefits of the increased light and the fresh air.  This invigorates your Bonsai.

 

TEMPERATURE –

 

Avoid sources of heat like radiators, heat vents, or large appliances like televisions.  A cooler room is better than a room that is too warm.  Heat will dry the Bonsai out and kill it.

 

HUMIDITY –

 

The best rooms for your Bonsai are kitchens and bathrooms which are normally more humid.  Keeping your tree sitting on a shallow drip tray will allow the excess water from the pot to evaporate slowly and increase humidity around it. 

 

Mist spraying the air around the tree may also be done using a small mister.  However, do not spray directly on the foliage.  The aim is to keep the humidity as high as possible so that your tree doesn’t dry out. 

 

WATERING –

 

Because Bonsai are in smaller pots than a lot of plants they require regular watering.  In warmer weather they will need to be watered more frequently than in cold conditions.  Water when the top of the soil feels dry to the touch.  After time, you will be able to tell when your Bonsai needs watering by lifting and feeling its weight.  The look of the soil and its color is also a useful guide.

 

Pot immersion is very effective.  Fill a clean bowl with cold water and sit the whole tree/pot in for a few minutes.  Once the soil is saturated remove it and set on a drip tray.  Some of the soil and granular feed can be lost and will need to be replaced periodically.  Be careful when a tree has been recently repotted as more soil may be washed away.  It is best not to immerse Bonsai that have recently been repotted or transplanted.

 

Do not heavily mist or water the tree/foliage itself.  Some prefer to use a water bottle to heavily mist the soil.  You may also gently pour water slowly onto the soil surface allowing it to be absorbed.  Use a “catch” or drip tray which will hold the run-off water to provide some humidity.

 

Note – if the soil will not easily accept water (as it tends to run off the soil surface) the Bonsai should be immersed.

 

FERTILIZING –

 

Bonsai trees require fertilizer just as other trees and plants do.  Liquid or granular fertilizer may be used.  Smaller Bonsai trees gain the best benefits from liquid fertilizer.  The larger Bonsai may be better suited to granular fertilizer.

 

You may fertilize every 2 to 3 weeks. 

 

Always water your Bonsai thoroughly before fertilizing and never use fertilizer on a dry tree.

 

Never fertilize a sick tree.  Fertilizer is not medicine.

 

Use a fertilizer at a percentage/ratio of 7-7-7 or less.  Some of the better fertilizers may come in a ratio of 20-20-20.  In this case you would need to dilute it down to one fourth strength for the proper application.*

 

If you are unsure how much fertilizer to use follow the directions on the label.  If you need to dilute it to the proper ratio use water.*

 

Fertilizer is a good thing.  Too much fertilizer is a bad thing.

 

TRIMMING –

 

Trimming should only be done sparingly to keep your Bonsai shaped.  If you plan to do any extensive trimming, reshaping, or transplanting seek expert advice. 

 

Enjoy your Bonsai !  Treat it well and it will be a great little companion for some time !

 

**********

 

GRASS FOR WEST TEXAS

 

Turf grass comes in many different types, colors and textures.  Turf is established by seed, sod or plugs – sun to shade – dry to moist.  Choose a grass that is best suited for your yard.

 

  • SEED: sold by the pound and is applied by square footage.Seed can be used for bare ground or to over-seed an existing lawn.Also available in hydro-mulch (commercially applied).Determine the square footage by multiplying length x width.Broadcast seed by hand or with a spreader using the recommended rate.Keep seed damp until all seed has sprouted (usually water lightly every day for 2-3 weeks).Fertilize only after you have begun mowing.

     

  • PLUGS: pre-rooted 4” x 4” squares sold in 18 count trays.Best used to fill small bare spots in yard.Dig small 4” x 4” hole, install plug and water.Water twice a week; fertilize anytime.

     

  • SOD: sold by the piece or by the pallet.Used for large bare areas, new construction or replacing old variety with new types of grass (shady areas due to tree growth).Sod pieces typically measure 16” x 24” or 24” x 24”; 2.5 sqft and 4 sqft respectively.Pallets will cover 450 sqft.Determine square footage and divide by 2.5.This will be how many pieces needed.Sod is cheaper by the pallet.Make sure you have bare ground.Clear area to be sodded.Install sod (green side up).Use a brick pattern to stagger the seams.Lay parallel to curb or house.Water daily for 3 weeks and then begin taking off a day per week.Use New Lawn Starter Fertilizer.

     

    TYPES OF TURF GRASS –

     

  • BERMUDA

  • Common – plugs, seed, sod – Full Sun

  • Tiff 419 – sod – Full Sun

  • Celebration – sod – Sun to Shade

  • Panam – seed – Full Sun

     

  • ST. AUGUSTINE

  • Raleigh – plug, sod – Sun to Shade

  • Palmetto – Sun to Shade

     

  • ZOYSIA

  • El Toro – Sun to Part Shade – Medium Texture

  • Empire – Sun to Part Shade – Fine Blade

  • Emerald – Sun to Part Shade – Fine Blade

  • Palasade – Sun to Part Shade – Broad Leaf

     

  • FESCUE

  • Used in Shaded Areas

  • Many varieties to choose from but a blend is best

  • RTF – Hybrid Fescue with Ryezomes – Part Sun to Shade

     

  • BUFFALO

  • Turffalo – plugs – Full Sun or Shade varieties

  • Common Buffalo – seed – Full Sun

     

    ARTIFICIAL TURF

  • Consider an artificial turf for areas that won’t grow grass

  • To reduce maintenance costs – watering, mowing, fertilizing, etc.

  • Use for putting green, dog runs, children’s play area, around pools

  • 6 different varieties

 

**********

 

Crape Myrtles in Your Landscape

 

 

DESCRIPTION

 

From showy flowers to the superb bark and foliage, the Crape Myrtle is a favorite landscape addition throughout the South.  It is hardy from Zones 7 to 9 and can be found in the South, Southwest, and West Coast.  Crape Myrtles are better suited for the warmer regions.

 

The Crape Myrtle is very adaptable.  It grows best in well drained soils, prefers full sun, and is drought resistant.  Blooms are most abundant in soils low in nutrients, especially nitrogen.  Throughout the blooming season, additional flowering can be stimulated by fertilization (10-15-9) and the removal of faded blooms.

 

Crape Myrtles can be used as a shrub or small tree, ranging in size from 18 inches to over 25 feet.  An asset to almost any landscape, the Crape Myrtle is a very beautiful specimen shrub or tree, often used in groupings and under planted with ground cover.  The smaller varieties can be used as hedges, screens, or in masses.  Planted in this manner, they offer a grand display of color throughout the Summer months.

 

Crape Myrtles are commonly multi-trunked, however, single trunk specimens are available at times.  A canopy of foliage covers the top half, with the bottom half trimmed up (leafless), revealing the beautiful bark.  The leaves of the Crape Myrtle will range from glossy green, green with red, and dark green to black in some new varieties.  The foliage will turn yellow, red-orange or red in the Fall.  The smooth bark exfoliates, flaking off in irregular patches to reveal various shades of brown to gray.

 

One of the most prominent features of the Crape Myrtle is the spectacular flowers, formed in large panicles ranging from 6 to 8 inches in length and 3 to 5 inches in width.  The petals have a crinkled appearance, similar to crepe paper, hence the name Crape Myrtle.  Blooming is from mid to late Spring through early Fall.  Flower color ranges from white to various shades of pink, purple, and red.

 

CARE OF CRAPE MYRTLES IN THE LANDSCAPE

 

Crape Myrtles revel in the full Summer sun and heat, so find a place that meets these requirements and you will be rewarded.  They grow best in any reasonably good soil.  The Crape Myrtle will even adapt to poor soil and doesn’t need much fertilizer.  A light application of fertilizer in Spring when growth begins is beneficial for older plants or those growing in in extremely poor soil.  While they tolerate a wide range of soil conditions once established, Crape Myrtles do not thrive in a very wet location.

 

Crape Myrtles bloom all Summer long providing bountiful Summer and Fall Color.  Hardy and beautiful, they tolerate heat, humidity, drought, and most well drained soils.

 

Container grown specimens can be planted at any time of the year, however, they must be watered conscientiously, particularly if they are planted in Summer.  Balled and burlapped and bare-root Crape Myrtles are generally better able to become established if they are planted during the dormant season.  Although the canopy of a Crape Myrtle may have lost its leaves in Fall, the roots typically remain active later into the Fall and early Winter seasons.  They transplant easily so they can be moved in the landscape.  Move them during the Fall  

 

 

CALENDAR YEAR TIPS

 

       JANUARY

  • Time to plant trees (fall and winter are best)!Use PHC Tree & Shrub Saver at planting.

  • Established trees and shrubs that need to be moved should be transplanted while completely dormant.  Dig carefully and hold soil in place around roots.Use PHC Tree & Shrub Saver for transplants.

  • Prune trees & apply Sealer to large cuts.

  • Be sure to water in winter every two weeks to protect from freeze damage.  Always water your landscape well before an extended freeze or ice storm.

                          

    FEBRUARY

  • Start Pre-Emergent program to keep weed seeds from germinating. Avert granules will take care of broadleaf and grassy type weeds (Amaze for flower beds ).  For Bermuda spray existing weeds with Fertilome Weed-Free Zone.

  • Feed trees & shrubs using Bayer or Fertilome Tree & Shrub Fertilizer or Fruit & Citrus Fertilizer.

  • Be sure to water.

  • Top dress with Cotton Burr Compost or BTN Nature's Blend for a healthier, stronger lawn.

  • Apply Dormant Oil to trees.

     

    MARCH

  • Apply first application of Fertilome Green Maker to lawn (every two months).

  • Add soil amendments to garden areas & flowerbeds to prep beds for spring planting.  Natural Guard Soil Activatoris an excellent additive for gardens or lawns and may be applied at the time of fertilizing.

  • Check for Borer damage; use Fertilome product to treat.  Use Tree & Shrub Treatment on all trees & shrubs to kill & prevent insects for one full year.

  • Apply Season Long Grub Control.

  • Watch for late freezes.

  • Plant garlic, potatoes, rhubarb, & asparagus!

     

    APRIL

  • Bermuda & St. Augustine sod becomes available.

  • Check out new bedding plants (Elephant Ears, Caladiums, Roses, Sod, etc.)!

  • Spray Systemic for pine tip moths.

  • Apply Rose Care Systemic Fertilizer .

  • Remember – Arbor Day is the last Friday in April!

     

    MAY

  • Apply second round of Fertilome Green Maker to lawns.

  • Use Systemic Fungicides & Insecticides on roses, vines, shrubs & grasses.

  • Fertilize spring bedding plants with Fox Farm Big Bloom or Tiger Bloom.

  • Check for seeding Bermuda; night time temperatures on average of 65 degrees.

  • Discard standing water to prevent mosquito infestation.

  • Spray for Bagworms with Fertilome.

  • Spray any existing weeds with Bonide Weed Beater.

     

    JUNE

  • Top dress beds with Mulch to help keep weeds down & retain moisture as it gets hotter.

  • Add Fox Farm Big Bloom or Tiger Bloom to Crape Myrtles to promote longer bloom time.

  • Spray any existing weeds in flower beds with Ornamec "Over-The-Top."

     

    JULY

  • Use Bloom Set on Tomatoes to prevent shedding due to heat.

  • Give extra care & water to trees, shrubs & plants while weather is hot.

  • Plant summer color!

  • Apply Fertilome Green Maker fertilizer to lawns.

     

    AUGUST

  • Watch for yellowing of grasses caused by lack of iron; use Dr. Iron.

  • Fungus may also cause yellowing & eventually death of turf grasses if not treated; use Bonide Infuse or Fertilome Fungicide.

  • Watch for insects on trees & shrubs; when found treat them quickly.

  • Apply Grub Control.

     

    SEPTEMBER

  • Apply second round of Avert Pre-Emergent.

  • Plant Fescue Seed later September through mid-November.

  • Final sod installations and the last month to order in sod.

  • Clean out beds to get ready for Pansies.

  • Plant Mums, Dianthus, Snapdragons & Dusty Miller now!

  • Apply Wintrizer Fertilizer (10-0-14) to lawns.

     

    OCTOBER

  • Plant trees & shrubs; be sure to use PHC Tree & Shrub Saver!

  • Contact us to get any construction on ponds, patios & sprinkler systems.

  • Contact us with any questions you have about winterizing ponds & fountains.

  • Time for winter color!

     

    NOVEMBER

  • Plant Pansies, Stock, & Snapdragons with Blood Meal!  Use Holly-Tone when planting Cabbage & Kale.

  • Plant trees!

  • Christmas Poinsettias arrive!

     

    DECEMBER

  • Water trees, shrubs & lawns.

  • After Christmas plant spring bulbs with Bone Meal.

  • Apply Dormant Oil to trees.

  • Plant trees!

  • Prune trees & shrubs now through March.

 

***************

THE BASICS –

 

 For Mini Gardens, Fairy Gardens & Terrariums

 

When making a mini garden, fairy garden or a terrarium you are only limited by your imagination.  The following are basic guidelines to help you build your own “little world.”

 

  • Choose the container.The size of the container will determine how much other materials you will need to use.

     

  • The first layer is for drainage so that your soil doesn’t stay soggy.You may use ½” - 1” of perlite, pea gravel or rock of your choosing.

 

  • A thin layer of charcoal is added next.Charcoal absorbs odors from any organic materialthat is decomposing and keeps the soil “sweet.”

 

  • Design your layout before adding soil, etc.Do you want different levels or walls?What type of plants (or just mosses) will you use?Will you add mini furniture, people &/or animals?

 

  • Add damp soil (not soggy).Squeeze excess water out of soil beforelayering it.

 

  • Begin to install your hardscape next.If you are planning different levels the walls should be installed before you put in plants.

 

  • After your hardscape is in you will have the available area ready for planting.NOTE – All plants should be well watered before installing them.(Moss does not need to be watered.)

 

  • Finish off your mini landscape with mosses or ground covers.You may set in your décor, stepstones, walkways, patios, etc.

 

  • If you are using a closed container it will make it’s own humidity.It isn’t unusual to have some “fogging” during the first weeks.You may leave the lid slightly open/ajar to relieve this.Be sure to seal the lid back up so that your garden doesn’t dry out.

 

  • If you are using an open or lidless container the water requirements will depend upon what type of plants, if any, are used.

 

***************

 

Crape Myrtle in Your Landscape

 

DESCRIPTION

 

From showy flowers to the superb bark and foliage, the Crape Myrtle is a favorite landscape addition throughout the South.  It is hardy from Zones 7 to 9 and can be found in the South, Southwest, and West Coast.  Crape Myrtles are better suited for the warmer regions.

 

The Crape Myrtle is very adaptable.  It grows best in well drained soils, prefers full sun, and is drought resistant.  Blooms are most abundant in soils low in nutrients, especially nitrogen.  Throughout the blooming season, additional flowering can be stimulated by fertilization (10-15-9) and the removal of faded blooms.

 

Crape Myrtles can be used as a shrub or small tree, ranging in size from 18 inches to over 25 feet.  An asset to almost any landscape, the Crape Myrtle is a very beautiful specimen shrub or tree, often used in groupings and under planted with ground cover.  The smaller varieties can be used as hedges, screens, or in masses.  Planted in this manner, they offer a grand display of color throughout the Summer months.

 

Crape Myrtles are commonly multi-trunked, however, single trunk specimens are available at times.  A canopy of foliage covers the top half, with the bottom half trimmed up (leafless), revealing the beautiful bark.  The leaves of the Crape Myrtle will range from glossy green, green with red, and dark green to black in some new varieties.  The foliage will turn yellow, red-orange or red in the Fall.  The smooth bark exfoliates, flaking off in irregular patches to reveal various shades of brown to gray.

 

One of the most prominent features of the Crape Myrtle is the spectacular flowers, formed in large panicles ranging from 6 to 8 inches in length and 3 to 5 inches in width.  The petals have a crinkled appearance, similar to crepe paper, hence the name Crape Myrtle.  Blooming is from mid to late Spring through early Fall.  Flower color ranges from white to various shades of pink, purple, and red.

 

CARE OF CRAPE MYRTLES IN THE LANDSCAPE

 

Crape Myrtles revel in the full Summer sun and heat, so find a place that meets these requirements and you will be rewarded.  They grow best in any reasonably good soil.  The Crape Myrtle will even adapt to poor soil and doesn’t need much fertilizer.  A light application of fertilizer in Spring when growth begins is beneficial for older plants or those growing in in extremely poor soil.  While they tolerate a wide range of soil conditions once established, Crape Myrtles do not thrive in a very wet location.

 

Crape Myrtles bloom all Summer long providing bountiful Summer and Fall Color.  Hardy and beautiful, they tolerate heat, humidity, drought, and most well drained soils.

 

Container grown specimens can be planted at any time of the year, however, they must be watered conscientiously, particularly if they are planted in Summer.  Balled and burlapped and bare-root Crape Myrtles are generally better able to become established if they are planted during the dormant season.  Although the canopy of a Crape Myrtle may have lost its leaves in Fall, the roots typically remain active later into the Fall and early Winter seasons.  They transplant easily so they can be moved in the landscape.  Move them during the Fall or late Winter.

 

PRUNING

 

Give careful consideration to the projected size of the mature Crape Myrtle, and select a variety that will not outgrow its boundaries.  Allow it to display its graceful beauty with minimal pruning.

 

Crape Myrtles need relatively little pruning.  In fact, to promote their appearance and vigor, only prune to thin, shape, or to remove any damaged or dead growth.

 

They bloom on the current season’s growth, so you can deadhead the spent blooms to encourage another round of blooms.  Don’t prune late in the season as this promotes growth when it should be going dormant for the winter.  Tender new shoots are likely to suffer and die once winter sets in.

 

To develop a tree shape, remove all limbs and sprouts growing from the ground level except the three to five strongest limbs.  As the tree matures, remove lower, lateral branches (limbing-up) one third to halfway up the height of the tree (if you want the “treed-up” effect).  Remove branches that are crossing or rubbing against each other or growing into the center of the canopy.  Make your cuts to a side branch or close to the trunk.  As the tree grows taller, you may remove lower branches as needed.  Remove any future growth from the ground to retain the desirable trunk structure.  Basal sprouting may occur whether you prune the tree or not.  Instead of pruning you’ll find it easy to pull sprouts out when they are young.  To improve the appearance of your Crape Myrtle in late Winter or early Spring before growth begins, prune off the seed heads above a lateral bud.  On small shrubby varieties, remove spent flower clusters and thin out small twiggy growth.

 

CRAPE MYRTLE PESTS

 

Powderly mildew is one of the biggest problems afflicting Crape Myrtles.  To prevent it, plant in sun with plenty of room for air to circulate and select varieties known to be resistant.

 

Sooty mold fungus is another common problem.  Sticky excretions from aphids attract this mold, which can become so thick the Crape Myrtle will deteriorate as a result of not being able to conduct photosynthesis.  To control aphids and sooty mold spray with soapy water, then rinse with clean water and use predators like Lady Bugs and Mantids.  A good yearly systemic treatment for insects and disease is always a good practice (done at the beginning of Spring).

***************

© Willow Creek Gardens   

1820 S. Treadaway Blvd, Abilene, TX 79602 

Monday - Saturday:  8 am - 6 pm